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Nhess
15 February 2016 @ 10:44 pm
Ok, first and foremost, I never really though that I would ever write something about a local loveteam in my blog! Heck, I didn't even thought that I will be a fan in the first place. But here I am pouring my heart out simply because I feel frustrated with all the hate these two people are getting and its already getting into my nerves.
So please pardon me with this non-Arashi related post. I still love them by the way, but I have to admit, that the fangirl inside me, slightly diverted its attention to local showbiz personalities.
Im not sure if everyone knew about them or at least heard of them because of twitter. Let us just say that they broke the record for the most number of tweets in 24hrs. Yes, they are Alden Richards and Maine (Yaya Dub) Mendoza, a.k.a AlDub.
For months now, I've been enjoying myself with this social media called twitter. For some strange reason, AlDub, just like Arashi, gives me goodvibes whenever I see them on TV and read something about them in twitter.
Yes, they are famous, you can see their faces almost 24/7 on tv because they just happen to score a lot of tv commercials. Mind you, they only had 1 movie and they're not even the lead actors. But people clamour for them. Simply because people ship them (people including myself). I truly believe that there's something going on between the two of them. That there is something beyond the friendship than what they were trying to say in public. But that is just my point of view.
At first, I was proud of this fandom. You won't believe how united the fans were, especially during "Tamang Panahon". If its not unity, then I dont know why we were able to achive that 41M tweets in a day. We faced a lot of challenges right from the start. They faced the ridicule of those that are outside the fandom. AlDub Nation (as we call ourselves) have to defend Alden and Maine from all the haters and bashers that wanted their downfall. But the Nation stood tall and never gave up. They were the barriers that kept all the negativity away from the two.
But months past, and slowly, I saw how the Nation started to crumble. There may still be bashers and haters outside the fandom, but the real battle are those from the inside. The nation started to break apart. The one sided fans started to crawl their way and ruined the once united family. One sided - because they are either Alden's fans who hate Maine or they are Maine's fans who hate Alden.
And then there are of course fans who wanted more, who wants to invade the privacy of the two and wants to know every details of them 24/7. And they are the very first people who gets hurt when they dont see what they wanted to see. They are those who are only after the "kilig" and nothing more.
These so-called fans are the reason why these two people are getting the hate that they obviously do not deserve. I feel bad for them. I used to just ignore them and close my twitter account everytime I read tweets that radiates all the negative vibes in to my body. But right after Alden and Maine read their poems for each other, I can sense the sincerity of every word. Yes, they have read the hate tweets, and yes, even if they say na "kebs lang", they are still afftected! And it hurts so much to know that they, too, are in pain.
I dont really know when and how this will end. People will always have something to say no matter what they do. Whether they admit or not that they are in a relationship, they will always be the subject of hate tweets. I dont know them personally. I haven't met them. But I do have knack of reading people, and I am seldom wrong. I can sense that they are two good souls. They help each other out. They are a team, for pete's sake! So I don't understand why the one-sided fans cant see the good that they brought to each other's lives. They are thankful for each other, so why cant they (one-sided fans) feel the gratitude towards their idol's loveteam?
Sigh, I am not here to preach. We have different opinions and I respect that. I just hope that in giving one's opinion, people will be more sensitive and not bash or bully others. Respect - is something that some people lack nowadays.
 
 
Current Mood: annoyedannoyed
 
 
Nhess
11 May 2015 @ 08:58 pm

So, I just came back from South Korea yesterday and I'm already missing it. But what I miss the most is the food! I fell im love with their sude dishes, most especially the fermented foods. When we were at Jeju, we ate at a local restaurant who served us fermented pollock as our side dish, and I love it! I didn't know where to buy one so on our way home to Manila, we stopped by one of the stores at Incheon airport and bought these:


Sadly, the taste is not up to par with what I ate at the Korean resto. :-(

I only got to try the octopus though. So hopefully, the fish and the squid will taste better.

 
 
Nhess
29 April 2015 @ 10:08 pm
One more day till my long awaited vacation! Ill be coming back to South Korea on Friday!!!

I am excited, yes... But I also feel conflicted for leaving. Taking a vacation means taking a leave from work. Which means I need to leave my team... Which means less headcount = more work for them. I feel bad since I know that May will be a busy month.

So as much as I want to feel the excitement, I can't. I feel guilty for leaving them. I want to finish my work but if the delay is from other people, all I can do is to chase them. sigh...

Buhay empleyado.


Posted via m.livejournal.com.

 
 
Nhess
05 March 2014 @ 10:10 pm
It's my first time celebrating my bday without you... It feels like a dream, and it hurts to know that it's real.

But then I know that what you want for us is to move forward. We will daddy... we will. We will move on but we will always treasure your memories in our hearts.

Although we argue on little things as we have opposing views, I cannot retaliate on one thing - that you have been a great dad to us. You may not be the perfect father, but you will always be the greatest daddy in the world.

And I may not be the perfect daughter but God knows how I tried my best to be one. Because I love you. I have always regretted not saying these words to you before, but I hope that you can still hear me from heaven...

I love you daddy, with all my heart. If I have been stubborn and hard headed, I’m sorry. I didn't mean to hurt you. Please do not think that I did not appreciate all the things you did for us, because I do. God knows I do.  You and mommy has always been there to guide us as we grow older. I knew the hardships both of you went through and we (with Roda and Nico) appreciate all of it. Thank you, because you made us the kind of persons we are today.

We love you so much daddy. You will never be forgotten.

Love,
Vanessa
 
 
Nhess
05 August 2013 @ 01:55 pm
Dati  
I've always been listening to foreign music... American, Korean, and of course Japanese. But I am still fond of our own songs and music... the OPM.

Heard this song playing in a bus while I'm commuting to work and I was kinda hooked. The song is catchy and I love the blending of Sam and Tippy's voices. Plus the lyrics of the song is somewhat nostalgic. The memories of my childhood kept playing in my mind while listening to this song.

The song by the way, is the grand winner of the Philippine Pop Music Festival 2013.


Dati
Composed by Thyro Alfaro and Yumi Lacsamana
Interpreted by: Sam Concepcion and Tippy Dos Santos (feat Quest)
PhilPop Festival 2013 Grand Winner


disclaimer: video not mine.
 
 
 
Nhess
24 December 2011 @ 07:31 pm
Counting the hours... minutes... seconds...

As the clock strikes 12, we will all be celebrating Christmas. But as the day approach, let us all remind ourselves that this Holiday Season is not only about the bright lights and cheerful songs. That beyond the Christmas bonus that we get... aside from worrying the things to buy in our Christmas shopping list... the Christmas parties and exchange gifts are only the material aspect of it. The true Spirit of Christmas is beyond all that.

Shredding off all selfish acts...

Forgiving and humbly asking for forgiveness...

Its all about Love... may it be love to your family, friends, relatives, acquaintance or even to a total stranger.

So to everyone, do celebrate Christmas in the true meaning of it.

Merry Christmas to all and have a Happy Holidays!


To the Victims of Sendong... its tough, but I hope and I pray that all of you will be able to overcome it. You are not alone and a lot of people have gathered to help you stand again. I hope to see your bright smiles again.

Tags:
 
 
Nhess
25 August 2010 @ 06:01 pm

In spite of everything... amidst the tragedy, I can say that I am still proud to be Pinoy!

I sincerely sympathize with the victims... I just read from the newspaper, HK is in rage... Im not sure... but if it’s true, I can't blame them... Lives were lost... and they are in great pain. They need to blame someone for what happened in order to release their anger… and their pain. If I were in their shoes, I may have felt the same…

I just hope that in time… their grief and pain can be soothed by our prayers… and that their hearts may not be clouded by hatred.

As to all the Filipinos… certainly there are lessons to be learned from this incident… and I am still in hopes that we can be a better nation.


 
 
Current Mood: sympatheticsympathetic
 
 
Nhess
28 December 2005 @ 03:43 am

I’ve read Arthur Golden’s "Memoirs of Geisha" and it was a nice book to read. This was the first time that I became acquainted to the Japanese culture. I’ve always feared the Japanese; though I wasn’t born during World War II, the stories of terrorism makes me shiver. At times, I pity those who were oppressed but oftentimes, I felt proud, especially to those who were able to stand despite the massive exploitation. With all the Asian countries, Japan is at the bottom of my list/ I didn’t really like Japanese men because I see them as a walking penis - always looking for something to satisfy their hunger and remind me of hundreds, if not thousands of comfort women who suffered during the war.

This book gave me a closer view of what Japan really is: their culture, their traditions and a little bit of history as well. Arthur Golden was able to put all these things together in his novel. By reading the book, Golden will take us to the time where women are successful being a Geisha. I’ve already heard of Geisha before, but as I’ve said, I was ignorant on Japanese culture, so I perceived them as 1st class prostitute. After reading the book, the question still remains whether Geishas are prostitutes or not.

I felt guilty especially when I read the interview of Mineko, Iwasaki, a renowned geisha and is Golden’s main source for his book. Mineko Iwasaki claimed that her intention of granting an interview with Golden is to clarify misconceptions on Geisha’s culture. Unfortunately, this is not what happened when she read Golden’s masterpiece.

With Memoirs of Geisha, Golden tackled the life of a Geisha named Sayuri and her struggle for independence of living the life of her own. However, Iwasaki perceived the book as a mere depiction of sex in Geisha’s life. According to Iwasaki, Geishas are basically taught different aspects of Japan’s arts and culture to entertain people in a non-sexual manner. I was quite confused with her statement and with what Golden’s interpretation of Geisha.

It seems that women entertainers are already a part Japanese culture. I can’t help but think of Filipino entertainers in Japan. Is this the reason why a lot Filipinos are working as Japayukis? Isn’t it Ironic that many Filipinos perceived Japayukis as some sort of prostitue or sex slave as well? Though some Japayukis claim that they do not engage on sex and their sole profession is to entertain Japanese men, this is not what most Filipinos perceived. Are the Japayukis and Geishas the same when it comes to misconception with regards to their profession? (I think this will just be another argument, Geishas might take this as an offensive comment, especially that they are advocates of the arts and culture of Japan. My point is just that they are commonly misunderstood by others who doesn’t understand and are not willing to understand their profession.)

Anyway, going back to Geisha - I’ve tried researching further about them, particularly their ritual called Mizuage. In the story, the main character, Sayuri, was sold to an okiya (Geisha House) to be trained as a Geisha or person of arts. According to an article I’ve read from http://www.immortalgeisha.com, the confusion as to whether Geishas are prostitutes or not seems to have stemmed both from the close proximity Geisha had to courtesans in the Edo era and the fact that they did technically originate from the red light districts. Also, after the World War II US soldiers who came home from Japan have encountered prostitutes disguising themselves as Geisha. Since US soldiers are not very well familiar to Japan’s culture, they wont really know the difference at all.

I understand that part of their history, but the reason why I have doubts on this "misconception" is because of their ritual called Mizuage. Part of becoming a Geisha is the Mizuage or the coming of age. In this ritual, different men interested to a young Geisha will bid for her virginity. This makes the confusion whether a Geisha is a prostitute or not. I’ve read several articles from the Internet claiming that Geisha are not prostitute, and that they never sold themselves for sex. But aren’t they selling sex in their mizuage?

I’ve read one of Arthur Golden’s interviews in the Internet where he was asked the same exact question, and let me quote him on this:

     "As a matter of fact, all through the years I worked on this novel, that was the first question people asked me. The answer isn’t a simple yes or no. The so-called "hot springs geisha," who often entertain at resorts, are certainly prostitutes. But as Sayuri says in the novel, you have to look at how well they play the shamisen, and how much they know about tea ceremony, before you determine whether they ought properly to call themselves geisha. However, even in the geisha districts of Kyoto and Tokyo and other large cities, a certain amount of prostitution does exist. For example, all apprentice geisha go through something they call mizuage, which we might call, "deflowering." It amounts to the sale of their virginity to the highest bidder. Back in the ’30s and ’40s, girls went through it as young as thirteen or fourteen–certainly no later than eighteen. It’s misleading not to call this prostitution, even child prostitution. So we can’t say that geisha aren’t prostitutes. On the other hand, after her mizuage, a first-class geisha won’t make herself available to men on a nightly basis. She’ll be a failure as a geisha, though, if she doesn’t have a man who acts as her patron and pays her expenses. He’ll keep her in an elegant style, and in exchange she’ll make herself sexually available to him exclusively. Is this prostitution? Not in the exact sense we mean it in the West, where prostitutes turn "tricks" with "johns," and so on. To my mind, a first-class geisha is more analogous to a kept mistress in our culture than to a prostitute." - Arthur Golden ( http://www.randomhouse.com/vintage/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780679781585&view=qa )

With this statement, I am not sure if "a kept mistress" will be much more acceptable for Geishas or they will find this statement as offensive as being called protitute. As I have said earlier, I am still ignorant on Japanese culture so I am not sure if polygamy is a taboo or not in their society. But by reading Golden’s book, it seems that a Japanese wife welcomes this notion. From the book itself, Japanese women will be very much happy to know that their husbands are keeping a Geisha as their mistress since their husband will always be in good mood upon coming home.

    "As well as being professional companions, they study dance, music, and literature. They are expected also to divert guests with their wit and by little tricks with a fan or sake cups. "A geisha is a woman who is available for higher to keep a man company, in fact it is a group of men. And to the surprise of Americans, that rarely involves sex. It simply does not exist in western cultures because we socialize together, and the Japanese do not. This is where geisha come in," explains Arthur Golden (The Secret). ( http://www.mtholyoke.edu/~oaandrey/geisha/party.html)

Perceptions do vary from culture to culture. Maybe Arthur Golden would like us to weigh our judgments by understanding the deeper essence of a Geisha in Japan’s history. Sometimes it will be hard for us-who lived outside their society to look into their culture more closely. Our perceptions may differ from others. Arthur Golden is not a Japanese nor is a woman. His style of writing is impressive as he was able to describe in full details the lifestyle of a Geisha. As a reader, you can easily visualize the physical features of Japanese culture and will let you feel what the protagonist feels in the story. But Arthur remains an American. In spite of the fact that he made an intensive research about Geisha, the fact still remains that he is a foreigner to his own book. His influence to Western culture can still be a hindrance to fully illustrate the true essence of a Geisha.

After reading Golden’s book, I became more interested on Geisha and of Japan. It leaves me a lot of question and I demand an answer. I don’t want to make any conclusion yet, through browsing the internet, I found that Mineko Iwasaki made a book of her own about her life as a Geisha. Maybe I can understand more clearly if I am to obtain the information from a real Geisha’s point of view.

It is hard to be ignorant on something that interests you. It is hard to know which one you want to believe in. My perception of a Geisha is gradually changing as I continue my quest to find the answer.

to be continued… (I will need to read Geisha: A life by Mineko Iwasaki first so I can compare) do you have one? Please lend it to me.. hehehe… I checked the bookstore for a copy of this book, and unfortunately, it costs more than 700php. So please, if you have one, lend it to me, okie?

 
 
Nhess
26 December 2005 @ 03:42 am

One entry I posted in my blog recently is about finding the purpose of life: The reason why everything happens unexpectedly and the reason why we can’t get all what we want. After reading this book, I realized that life’s purpose and meaning is beyond the reach of our senses. It may seem petty and worthless but we’ll never know how we touch the lives of others in the simplest way. This book has been very inspiring. (Though there are some parts that bore me because of the long narrative.. hehehehe…) Let me post some of the lines from this book that inspires me a lot, hope it touches your life as it touched mine. 

* All endings are also beginnings. We just don’t know it at the time…

* Fairness does not govern life and death. If it did, no good person will ever die young.

* Strangers are just family you have yet to come to know.

* No life is a waste. The only time we waste is the time we spend thinking we are alone. 

* Dying… is not the end of everything. We think it is. But what happens on earth is only the beginning.

* Sacrifice is a part if life. It’s supposed to be. It’s not something to regret. It’s something to aspire to. Little sacrifice. Big sacrifices.

* Sometimes, when you sacrifice something precious, you’re not really losing it. You’re just passing it on to someone else.

* Holding anger is poison. It eats you from the inside. We think that hatred is a weapon that attacks the person who harmed us. But hatred is a curved blade. And then the harm we do, we do to ourselves.

* No one is born with anger. And when we die, our soul is freed from it.

* Life has to end. Love doesn’t.